7 Ways to Accomplish More with the Same Reps and Sets

The typical solution to making an exercise or given weight harder is to do more reps, run farther, workout longer, etc. The problem with this approach is that there comes a point where you can only spend so much time training per day, and the ‘more is better’ approach eventually leads to running out of time and or overtraining/injury.

There is an elegant solution that requires far less time while providing a higher return for your investment.
Continue reading

The One Arm One Leg Pushup

Part II: 11 Tips for Achieving the One-Arm One-Leg Push-Up

In Part One I explained that just like Nigel Tufnel’s amp that goes to eleven, more pushups aren’t always better. Sometimes, less is more and building up to the one-arm one-leg push-up (OAOLPU) is an excellent alternative to simply adding reps onto your push-up routine. It’s worthy challenge that will keep most people busy for a long time.

When people first attempt the one-arm one-leg push-up they either struggle to balance in the starting position or when they descend to the first sticking point they lose it and hit the pavement like a bag of wet cement.  Achieving your first legit rep is a lot more involved than simply doing pushups and lifting an arm and a leg.

Eleven Tips For Conquering The One-Arm One-Leg Push-Up (This list goes to eleven) Continue reading

Increasing Productivity with Technique Regression Ladders

I found the following workout in my journals from 2008 to 2010. Reading my notes made the memories and sensations flood back to me. The workout was so intense that I’ve never had the courage to repeat it as written. It was basically an experiment using my Polar Heart Rate Monitor to discover how I could burn the most calories in the shortest amount of time. Continue reading

If You Wished You Were Strong…

Let’s face it, fitness can be intimidating.
A bunch of sweaty people pretending to be tough…  grunting loudly and throwing around slogans like “No Pain, No Gain!” or “Feel the Burn!” gets to be a little too much for the average person. Then you watch some of the outrageous training videos or fitness competitions and you get more than just a little freaked out by the insanity and machismo or inappropriate sexuality.

If you’re like me, then you believe fitness shouldn’t be a competition or a fashion show. Training should make you better at something other than …  just being better at training.  Training should improve your posture, your strength, your confidence and your quality of movement. Training shouldn’t be your life, it should improve your ability to to enjoy life.

If you’ve ever wished you were strong enough to train with barbells, dumbbells or kettlebells, but didn’t think you were…  or just wished you knew how to get started then I have just the resource for you:

“Foundations of Strength”  by StrongFirst is an excellent video with clear instruction that goes over the basics of how to safely and efficiently perform some powerful and effective techniques that will help the average person accomplish any level of fitness they choose. You’ll learn fundamental barbell, dumbbell, kettlebell, bodyweight and sandbag movements to help mold the body you were meant to have.

Watch the video, takes notes and hit the gym or just train at home, then watch it again and repeat.
Eventually you’ll want to know more, but this is a great place to start.  I’ve had the opportunity to meet and chat with
Mark Toomey and I can tell you without reservation that he is a gentlemen, a scholar and an excellent instructor who walks the talk.  At Omaha Elite Kettlebell we use the exact methods and principles shared in this video so I feel confident you’ll you like what you see and hear.

If you need further assistance or a more specific training plan, check out some of the recommended links above on the right such as “Power to the People” and “Simple & Sinister”. Check out the more expansive online store above or give me a shout, I’ll be glad to help or point you in the right direction.

Remember, strength is a choice.

"If you never thought you were strong enough to lift weights but wish you were, this is a great class for you.   I always walk into class a little nervous that I might not be up to the challenge, and then leave saying, "I did it!" and feel good about it the rest of the day. Scott really knows his stuff. He will customize to your individual needs...this is not a "one size fits all" class. Scott has taught me how to get more out of 5 reps than I used to get out of 25. My whole core is stronger as a result. Now when I go back to other classes, everything seems easier. Less really is more."  - Karen Bexten

 

 

 

 

SIMPLE SAMPLE KETTLEBELL WORKOUTS

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I usually avoid workouts of the day and I’m typically not one for posting them.  I believe that stringing together a random series of single workouts simply can’t deliver the kind of results that a well thought out program can.  Additionally, if someone tackles a “WOD” before they are ready for it, then the chance of injury is high.

Let me point out a few differences between workouts and programs:

  • Workouts are about being entertained and challenged right now, while programs are about long term results and preparing your for a challenge.
  • Workouts have a one size fits all mentality, while programs take the individual’s goals and limitations into consideration.
  • Workouts are there to kick your ass, while programs are designed to make you better.
  • A workout is simply something you do once then repeat rarely or never again, while a program often consists of the same workout repeated daily, for weeks on end with a few variables changing over time.

The Right Time and Place
While I’m clearly in favor of following a good program over working out… I do believe that there is a right time and place for a good workout every now and then.

The Right Time
The right time is when you need variety, need to test yourself after completing a program, or need to blow off some steam AND you don’t have any conflicting goals that the workout can interfere with such as needing to perform at a high level within the next day or three.

The Right Place
Your are in the right place in your training for these workouts when you have all of the featured techniques  dialed-in at such a high level that there is practically zero chance of you doing it incorrectly even under a high level of fatigue.

Here are a two sample kettlebell only workouts for your amusement. Be sure to use them only at the time and place.

WORKOUT #1: “GOING BALLISTIC”
The idea behind this workout is to start out with a relatively difficult movement then move on to progressively easier and easier ones as fatigue sets in. Every movement is ballistic and done with maximum hip drive.

Grab three different sized bells  small medium and large.
Men: 16kg, 24kg, 32kg, Women 8kg, 12kg, 16kg

Whatever technique you are using, perform an all out set per arm with the heaviest bell, then do the same with the medium bell and finally then smallest bell. When you are done, start over with the largest bell using a slightly less demanding lift.
Keep moving on to less and less demanding lifts until you are thoroughly “worked out”.

Example:
Using three single bells

  1. Snatches: Heavy x all out left & all out right, Medium x all out left & all out right, Light x all out left & all out right,
  2. High Pulls: Heavy x all out left & all out right, Medium x all out left & all out right, Light x all out left & all out right,
  3. Cleans: Heavy x all out left & all out right, Medium x all out left & all out right, Light x all out left & all out right,
  4. Swings: Heavy x all out left & all out right, Medium x all out left & all out right, Light x all out left & all out right,

Of course if  you’re advanced and have the means you can always Double the Pleasure by using three pairs of bells instead.
Example

  1. Double Snatches: heavy all out,  medium all out, light  all out
  2. Double High Pulls: heavy all out,  medium all out, light  all out
  3. Double Cleans: heavy all out,  medium all out, light  all out
  4. Double Swings: heavy all out,  medium all out, light  all out

Note: Using this double format I was able to perform a 15-minute workout that burned 26 calories per minute.  I never repeated it.

Workout #2: “MR. CLEAN’S LADDER”
This workout features the clean and reminds me of the telephone game we played in grade school.
Using one or two bells perform 1 rep of a clean, then one rep of a technique of your choice.
Remember this sequence and repeat it adding another clean and another technique, then repeat this new sequence adding again and again and again.

  1. 1 Double Clean + 1 Front Squat
  2. 1 Double Clean + 1 Front Squat + 1 Clean + 1 Military Press
  3. 1 Double Clean + 1 Front Squat + 1 Clean + 1 Military Press + 1 Clean + 1 Snatch
  4. 1 Double Clean + 1 Front Squat + 1 Clean + 1 Military Press + 1 Clean + 1 Snatch + 1 clean + 1 Push Press

Climb as high as you can then rest as little as necessary.
Repeat the same ladder with the chosen techniques stacked in reverse order

  1. 1 Double Clean + 1 Push Press
  2. 1 Double Clean + 1 Push Press + 1 clean + 1 Snatch
  3. 1 Double Clean + 1 Push Press + 1 clean + 1 Snatch + 1 clean + 1 Military Press
  4. 1 Double Clean + 1 Push Press + 1 clean + 1 Snatch + 1 clean + 1 Military Press + 1 clean + 1 Front Squat

The same workout can be performed with higher reps per ladder or a single bell so you’ll need to repeat each ladder twice (once with each side of your body).

 

 

 

IMPROVE YOUR PULL-UPS BY LEARNING TO RIDE WAVE

RIDING THE PULL-UP WAVE

The pull-up is possibly the king of bodyweight exercises. It encourages a healthy strength to bodyweight ratio, builds strong abs, lats and a mean grip. Most people think of the pull-up as an exercise in upper body strength, but when it comes to conquering a pull-up or adding more reps strong abs and timing of the breath are essential.

THE PULL-UP DEFINED

First, let’s be clear on what a pull-up is:
A pull-up begins with you hanging motionless from the bar in an overhand grip, with arms extended and your feet off of the ground.
From this motionless dead-hang, you will pull yourself up without swinging or kicking until your throat or chest touches the bar.
Consecutive pull-ups require you to lower yourself under control and start each rep anew from a motionless dead hang.
No kicking, swinging or kipping is allowed. Ever.

THE STICKING POINTS OF THE PULL-UP
During any lift there comes a point in the movement where you experience poor leverage or a transition between muscle groups that can cause your lift to slow down or grind to a halt.

Here are the three most common sticking points I’ve found in the pull-up.

  • The start: Overcoming the inertia of the dead-hang.
  • The Mid-Point: the point where your elbows approach shoulder level
  • 3/4 The Way Up: The point where the bar approaches eye level.

As with any lift there are a lot of little tricks of the trade to develop the strength to pull or push your way out of your sticking point such as partial reps, isometric holds and so on. But another way is to learn to shift gear and accelerate before you get stuck. I’ve found that hardstyle abdominal training and power breathing as taught in the StrongFirst School of Strength are two great ways to cruise through these sticking points.

HARDSTYLE ABS
To improve your pull-ups you’ll need stronger abs. You don’t need a visible six pack, but you will need a strong midsection. This can be accomplished through a variety of methods, but before your start cranking out worthless traditional crunches putting your spine into flexion I strongly recommend the methods found in Hardstyle Abs and the StrongFirst Bodyweight Instructor Course. The methods are vastly superior to traditional sit-ups and safer. With a qualified instructor these methods can produce dramatic results in a single session and life-changing results after 8-12 weeks. After learning these methods you’ll find ways to strengthen your abs anywhere with little to no equipment in a manner that will actually strengthen and protect your back instead of injuring it through commonly practiced methods.

During a pull-up strong abs can be used to knit the entire body into a solid and more manageable piece to be controlled in space.
This becomes evident with the following mental experiment: Imagine pulling a friend up over a wall who is holding still then another friend who is flailing about. The one who is holding still makes your job easier by allowing you to direct all of your effort into pulling, while a friend who flails about causes you to expend extra energy toward steadying or steering him as you pull.

The ability to both strongly and quickly contract and relax your abs means you relax at the proper time during a pull-up and quickly tighten in time to cruise through a sticking point.

Note: “Hardstyle Abs” is the title of a fantastic book on abdominal training by Pavel Tsatsouline. ALL of the abs drills I use and teach are derived from his methods contained in the “Hardstyle Abs” as well as what I’ve learned from attending his courses and bodyweight strength instructor certifications.  I recommend them because they are 1) Safe, 2) Simple and 3) Devestatingly Effective. One of the principles behind hardstyle ab training is learn to generate MORE tension with your abs and to do so faster. This ability to quickly contract your abs AND contract them harder is the equivalent of putting in a powerful engine so your car.

BREATHING
Athletes such a powerlifters, martial artists, boxers and volley ball players understand that breath control is the key to producing power, or relaxation. A long sigh can relax, while a short intense grunt produces maximal strength. Listen to a pro tennis player hit a ball with power and you’ll notice a sharp and loud exhalation similar to a grunt to produce power followed by longer drawn out sigh to promote quick relaxation. To learn power breathing, I recommend visiting a StrongFirst certified Instructor, preferably one who is certified as bodyweight instructor as well.

RIDING THE WAVE
One way to get better at pull-ups is to coordinate your abdominal contraction around your breathing.
Initiate the pull-up with a grunt, pushing the diaphragm down and zipping up the abs with the intention of shortening the distance between your sternum and belly button. If done properly, you will feel like you are braced for a punch to the midsection. By strongly and quickly contracting your abs in this manner while hanging from a pull-up bar your feet will pull up quickly and start a shockwave that travels upward within the body. When you can do this strongly it’s like getting a small push from below to start your pull-up.

Practice this combination by hanging, then tightening/grunting as you give an initial pull, do this repeatedly for several reps.
Notice sensation it creates as well how far it gets you into the pull-up. Also, take note of how quickly the tension from the initial explosive grunt dissipates. This is the initial “wave”. It will only get you so far, to your first sticking point to be exact, but it’s a great start.

Now that you have practiced this explosive take-off it’s time to learn to quickly change gears and keep accelerating.
Just before you hit your first sticking point where the upper arms are approaching parallel to the floor tighten up your abs and glutes again with a sharp powerful hiss and pull. This second contraction of the midsection momentarily increases the tension in your midsection and surrounding muscles to facilitate a stronger pull. The key is to time it perfectly so that you get tight-ER just before you hit the sticking point and you continue accelerating. When done properly you’ll practically glide right through your first sticking point. The next sticking point occurs just before you are about to clear the bar. By adding another strong contraction / sharp hiss just before this sticking point you improve your chances of cruising past it as well.

So the pull-up is initiated with a grunt, then quickly followed by a short hiss and increased tension when necessary before a sticking point.

NOTE: It’s important to point out that in both types of breathing an audible grunt and hiss are not the goal of the power breathing but the result of an incredibly forceful abdominal contraction. Simply making noise misses the point and will not give you the desired result. The grunt is the result of the initial contraction and the hiss is the result of breathing out while tightening the midsection further.

Like anything that requires timing, this skill will require practice.
To practice and get this down you will need a partner to help you through the sticking points at first. Your partner will place their hand on the center of your back. When you get stuck, your partner’s job is to give you just enough assistance to keep moving and finish the rep.The speed of the assisted rep should be as close as possible to the speed you intend to do an unassisted rep. As you practice your partner should give you feedback and communicate to you when he or she feels you are improving and requiring less assistance. Eventually your partner will need to push less and less or not at all.

Give this a shot and let me know how it helps your pull-up training.

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One of the great things about kettlebells  is their unsurpassed versatility which allows for incredibly efficient training sessions.
Today, after teaching my group and private classes I had 15 minutes to myself and was able to get in a nice little practice session with two 24kg kettlebells and a 16kg.

In just under 13 minutes I did the following [Watch the video]:

Level I techniques

  • Double Kettlebell Swings
  • Double Kettlebell Cleans
  • Double Kettlebell Presses
  • Double Kettlebell Front Squats
  • Double Kettlebell Snatches

Level II techniques

  • Double Kettlebell Push Presses
  • Single Kettlebell Bent Presses
  • Double Kettlebell Clean & Jerks
  • Single Kettlebell Windmills
  • Stacked Kettlebell Presses
  • Double Kettlebell Windmills.

Looking back it was a nice little practice. As far as changes go, I’d add in Getups  and a pulling motion (Pull-ups with the 24kg on my foot) or Renegade rows if no pull-up bar were available.  For a “Finisher” I’d wrap up with a hard set of one of the featured ballistics (swings, snatches, or clean & jerks) then stretch everything out with some windmills.

My original intent was to simply film myself performing a variety of StrongFirst Level I & Level II kettlebell techniques for the sake of review and analyzing the video to determine what I need to work on.  But, watching it I realized that this may also give people interested in kettlebell training a sense of how efficient a kettlebell session can be as well as see how some of the single kettlebell techniques can be progressed to more a challenging level.

Enjoy.

John Scott Stevens
Omaha Elite Kettlebell

Kettlebells are an incredibly versatile and efficient way to train.

When all you have is 15 minutes, nothing beats the efficiency and versatility of kettlebell training.

StrongFirst Kettlebell Training: An Efficient Practice

DROP and GIVE ME FIVE

Want to get stronger? Give Me Five Reps!

I know what you’re thinking… “Five!? Five is easy!” Bingo! That’s the whole point… most people CAN drop and give me five, or two sets of five, or a set of two then three repeated twice. Only a few can give me fifty that actually amounts to something. If the average person gives me fifty, the first five are good, reps six through ten are questionable and the last 40 are like watching a train wreck. But, that’s the way most people train, hammering away regardless of form and grind out horrible reps so they can get a three for one work-out: they stay weak, they get sore and they get self-induced injuries as a extra bonus.

One of the biggest “secrets” to reaching any goal is consistency. There is great strength in consistency. Repeat a correct performance often enough and you WILL become very good at it. Practice two sets of five perfect reps, five days a week for 40 workouts and at the end of the 8 weeks I’ll show you 10 STRONG reps.

Another secret is setting small easily achievable goals that build upon one another.
Can you do ten reps today, and the day after that for 40 workouts? Yes, that’s reasonable. By doing so can you increase you bench press by 10lbs in 8 weeks? Yes, that’s reasonable. Can you simultaneously improve in one or two other lifts by a similar amount during those 8 weeks. Easily. Can you do this several times throughout the year? I think so. Can you do this for several years to come over the span of your athletic career? Now that’s strength training.

This is one of the themes of “Easy Strength” by Dan John & Pavel Tsatsouline that is having a huge impact on the way professional athletes train strength. Keep it brief, make it realistic, keep it perfect and keep it simple. Pick two to three full body movements that address your weaknesses and practice ten reps of each consistently for 40-workouts. It sounds too simple to work, but that’s exactly why it works… it IS simple, it IS doable, it IS brief and it IS something that is reasonable to do for 40 consecutive workouts. “Easy Strength” is ideal for athletes because low rep heavy lifts have been shown to not produce muscular soreness and it allows athletes more time to focus on practicing and mastering their sport.

I recently attended Pavel Tsatsouline’s & Dan John’s Easy Strength two day workshop in Reno, NV. It was an amazing experience where I was surrounded by a lot of great strength professionals, a lot of who where RKCs. The workshop covered Dan John’s incredibly useful concept of putting athletes into quadrants to determine their training needs, templates for “Easy Strength Training” and “Even Easier Strength Training”. We received top notch coaching in the Olympic Lifts from Dan and Pavel and a lot more.

For those of you who have not read “Easy Strength” watched the DVD set or attended the “Easy Strength Workshop” here are just a handful of gems:

  • Don’t confuse strength training with conditioning & endurance.
  • The stronger you are the easier it is to achieve fat loss, speed, endurance, power etc…
  • The stronger you are the more wiggle room you have when it comes to dieting.
  • The reasons plyometrics is a waste of time for most people.
  • Why lunges are not appropriate for most.
  • How to make significant strength and performance gains in as little as 20-30 minutes of strength training 3 days per week.

As an RKC I get paid to help people get stronger. As it is for most RKCs getting someone stronger is easy. Now it’s even easier. Armed with new tools, knowledge and renewed enthusiasm I can’t wait to see what strength gains my clients will be experiencing in the next 8-weeks. What can you accomplish in 40-workouts?

Give me a call, I’ll create a professionally designed “Easy Strength” program for you and begin 8-weeks to a stronger you.

Stop the Insanity: Simpler is Better.

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It all started for me in 2006, I went to bed one night and woke up the next morning fat.
I bought myself a Speed Rope and Buddy Lee’s book on jump rope training and stuck to the plan. I started off fat but average at jump rope and within a year I was making that jump rope hum and buzz at a dizzying rate enough to make Rocky Balboa look bad. I could jump 40-minutes with only a handful of missed jumps and do things like 110 revolutions in 30 seconds. 50 consecutive double-unders & double-under cross-overs were something I do on moments notice on a bad day. I was lighter, faster, more agile and a hell of a lot leaner. Two problems…

  • I’d wake up with my feet killing me. (Plantar Fasciatis from all the stress of jumping.)
  • While I was indeed leaner with improved cardio, I was not any stronger.

I realized that while jumping rope was an incredible exercise it wasn’t something I wanted to do or could continue doing for up to 40-minutes 5-days a week for the rest of life and it wasn’t going to improve my physique or strength past a certain degree. Then I discovered Kettlebells. For years I had been reading books on martial arts and flexibility training and there’d always be these ads by some Russian guy promising to get me in the splits in record time. I’d read those ads and sneer…. until I bought one of those books and his stuff worked, not full splits in minutes… but 12 inches improvement after years of being plateaued in seconds. So when this same Russian promised Kettlebell training would deliver the same sort of rapid strength and endurance gains I was intrigued to say the least.

I purchased the book “Enter the Kettlebell” and read it several times, took notes and bought my self some kettlebells. I followed the plan provided in ETK and stuck to it. A few weeks of the break-in program called “The Program Minimum” and then I began my journey to as the Evil Russian put it “become a man among men” by following the program entitled the “Rite of Passage”. Within months I was making rapid, incredible and unbelievable gains with only six exercises: Getups, Swings, Cleans, Presses, High Pulls and Snatches all done with a single kettlebell. Here are just some of the benefits I experienced

  • I lost 14lbs of body fat and replaced it with 14lbs of muscle.
  • I rehabbed a shoulder that used to sound like broken glass during warm-ups
  • I rehabbed a chronically sprained ankle that had bothered me for years within 4 workouts
  • I went from pressing the 16kg/35lb kettlebell to man-handling the 24kg/53lb kettlebell
  • My posture improved so dramatically that I was frequently shocked by my own reflection in mirrors. Out of the corner of my eye, I would honestly see this guy following me that I didn’t recognize, turn my head and realize it was my own reflection.
  • Developed forearms that drew unsolicited compliments from other men in the gym.
  • Develop muscles on neck, back and shoulder that honestly freaked me out the first time I discovered them by accident in a mirror.
  • Lowered my resting heart rate from the 70s to the low 40’s in just 4 weeks.

That was the start. Now it’s 5 years later. I completed the Rite of Passage: I can one arm press a Kettlebell 1/2 my bodyweight and perform 200 or more reps of kettlebell snatches in 10-minutes with a 53lb kettlebell. I’ve earned my RKC, RKC II and CK-FMS Kettlebell instructor certifications.
I’ve taught thousands of group and private Kettlebell lessons, hosted kettlebell workshops and certifications, successfully trained others who have gone on to lose weight, transform their bodies, become better athletes or go on to become HKC and RKC certified instructors themselves. Just yesterday I returned from a continuing education workshop for kettlebell instructors and strength coaches and I’m scheduled to attend several more this year alone. I learned more about fitness in 23 hours of my first RKC than most trainers learn in a decade. Since then I learned even more, more than I honestly ever thought there was to know and I’ve discovered that strength and fitness are simple. Not easy, but simple and I owe everything I’ve learned to Pavel, John DuCane, Dan John, Jon Engum, Gray Cook, Brett Jones, Thomas Phillips, Zar Horton, David Whitley, Betsy Collie, Karen Smith and all of the strong, and intelligent professionals in the RKC School of Strength that I’ve had the honor to learn from.

Why am I telling you this? I suppose it’s because despite all the disinformation and crap out there concerning exercise and fitness there’s so little of it that actually delivers the results as promised in a way that is realistic, reasonable and sustainable for life. Programs like Crossfit, P90X, Insanity, and Biggest Loser are selling people on the idea that every workout has to be insane performed at a super high intensity. That if you’re not wearing a shirt that insults someone else’s performance you’re not a real athlete or worthy to train in certain gym. That puking and muscular soreness are admirable goals. That Box Jumps are appropriate for a 300 pound female with bad ankles and knees as well as for a teenage volleyball player who can’t perform a decent squat with her own bodyweight.

Fitness doesn’t require another intense 90-day program and boxes of supplements. It doesn’t demand high risk exercises like box jumps for obese weight loss clients or a skinny female trainer yelling at you on television. You don’t need Tires to flip, sledge hammers, bosu balls, plyo boxes, Concept II Rowing Machines, boxing bags, and all the other equipment necessary for the next Workout of the Day.

Still don’t believe me?
Here’s more proof… Karen Smith Sr. RKC performing a strict one arm press, weighted dead hang pullp and one legged squat with the 53lb kettlebell all in two months with just 10 reps a day of each exercise, … no puking, no box jumps, no screaming trainers.

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The RKC Methods can deliver elite fitness with as little a Kettlebell and your bodyweight.
But your’e not hearing me. The kettlebell won’t deliver the results, the exercises won’t either…the RKC Methods will. The RKC Methods will deliver results regardless of the tool you choose to use. It’s documented and proven and the RKC methods are currently in use by professional athletes, special forces and more… for a reason, THEY WORK! The RKC Methods consistently provide the kind of safe and effective techniques that can transform a fat couch potato into an athlete or transform an athlete into a champion. Moreover, the RKC never rests it is constantly improving. The RKC is a think tank that continues to attract the best of best and develops people that are stronger than they look and stronger than most people believe they have the right to be.

Are you tired of the fitness B.S. and seeking a coach that will cut the crap and give you ONLY what you need.

Do you want results, not fitness oriented entertainment?

Are you tired of the macho posturing in fitness; the puking, the tough talk and slogans that insult your intelligence?

Do you want training that is high yield, not high risk?

Do you want to be stronger in your 70’s that most people are in their 20’s?

Are you ready to commit to 6 years of smart, sustainable & repeatable training vs 6 weeks of stupidity that virtually guarantees injury?

If this sounds like you, then I can’t wait to meet you and help you achieve and ultimately surpass your fitness goals. As an active and constantly growing/improving RKC, RKC II, CK-FMS instructor I am uniquely qualified to deliver exactly what you seek. Safety, Strength, Intelligent training and Results.

So after you’ve recovered from your W.O.D. induced injury, discovered you really can’t train like the highlite reels from The Ultimate Fighter, put away your P-90X DVDs, or have gotten fed up with that skinny lady yelling at you in bootcamp, give me a call and together we’ll begin an intelligent approach to fitness that you will look forward to doing AND be able to do for the rest of your life.

Start your “Rite of Passage” from victim of insantiy to master of your own health by calling me at 402-850-5551.